Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 5
First time firing our service weapons, the Galil. Having never owned a firearm, I was surprised by how…fragile they seem to be.
For all the tales I’d heard of the AK-47’s resilience, I expected its clone to be less prone to malfunctions. But guns would frequently jam, deform cartridges or otherwise fail.
And in an attempt to keep the torrent of problems at bay, we’d do weapon maintenance. Lots of weapon maintenance. Lots and lots and lots of weapon maintenance.
The sight of people lined up in a corridor, scrubbing their rifles, would become a very regular sight throughout the service.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 5

First time firing our service weapons, the Galil. Having never owned a firearm, I was surprised by how…fragile they seem to be.

For all the tales I’d heard of the AK-47’s resilience, I expected its clone to be less prone to malfunctions. But guns would frequently jam, deform cartridges or otherwise fail.

And in an attempt to keep the torrent of problems at bay, we’d do weapon maintenance. Lots of weapon maintenance. Lots and lots and lots of weapon maintenance.

The sight of people lined up in a corridor, scrubbing their rifles, would become a very regular sight throughout the service.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 4
Not much thoughts about this week, so have a small slice-of-life sketch instead.
The KSP-58 (a Swedish variant of the FN MAG) has a carrier handle to make carrying it around easier. However, that handle also doubles as the lever for detaching the barrel from the rifle.
Thus, the first time recruits would pick up the KSP-58, they would often accidentally detach the barrel, causing the rest of the weapon to fall to the ground, resulting in this rather comical sight of a puzzled solider with only half a weapon.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 4

Not much thoughts about this week, so have a small slice-of-life sketch instead.

The KSP-58 (a Swedish variant of the FN MAG) has a carrier handle to make carrying it around easier. However, that handle also doubles as the lever for detaching the barrel from the rifle.

Thus, the first time recruits would pick up the KSP-58, they would often accidentally detach the barrel, causing the rest of the weapon to fall to the ground, resulting in this rather comical sight of a puzzled solider with only half a weapon.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 3
Aside from the aforementioned annoyance at the constant confusion and unreliable instructions, the most frequent feeling throughout the early weeks was that of being filthy.
Perhaps that day you’ll run through the obstacle course and be covered in a mix of dirt and sand.
Perhaps you’ll spend a few hours sitting in the blazing sun in full combat gear instead, sweating like a hog.
Perhaps you’ll add your backpack to that combat gear (totalling about 25kg of gear) and go on a 15km hike.

Showers, in such times were nearly blissful (although all-too-brief) moments of respite from the mood-crushing sense of filthyness. Little happy moments of cleanliness.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 3

Aside from the aforementioned annoyance at the constant confusion and unreliable instructions, the most frequent feeling throughout the early weeks was that of being filthy.

Perhaps that day you’ll run through the obstacle course and be covered in a mix of dirt and sand.

Perhaps you’ll spend a few hours sitting in the blazing sun in full combat gear instead, sweating like a hog.

Perhaps you’ll add your backpack to that combat gear (totalling about 25kg of gear) and go on a 15km hike.

Showers, in such times were nearly blissful (although all-too-brief) moments of respite from the mood-crushing sense of filthyness. Little happy moments of cleanliness.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 2
The most consistently frustrating thing throughout this experience has been without a doubt navigating the minefield created by the caprices of one’s superior officers. 
Like a mythical many-headed beast that cannot decide what to do, the officers each had their own idea how things should be done, but you could be certain that it would be you that would be getting slapped across the room for their collective indecisiveness.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 2

The most consistently frustrating thing throughout this experience has been without a doubt navigating the minefield created by the caprices of one’s superior officers. 

Like a mythical many-headed beast that cannot decide what to do, the officers each had their own idea how things should be done, but you could be certain that it would be you that would be getting slapped across the room for their collective indecisiveness.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 1
As noted before, I’ve been serving in the military since July. To keep my drawing skills from becoming too rusty I kept a visual diary of the experience.
——-
Welcome to the military. Hope you weren’t too fond of this whole “privacy” thing. Or that “personal space” thingy. You probably didn’t need those anyway.

Military Service Memoirs: WEEK 1

As noted before, I’ve been serving in the military since July. To keep my drawing skills from becoming too rusty I kept a visual diary of the experience.

——-

Welcome to the military. Hope you weren’t too fond of this whole “privacy” thing. Or that “personal space” thingy. You probably didn’t need those anyway.

And with that, I bid thee adieu

As fate would have it, I live in a country that is neither wealthy enough to just have a standing army nor is it safe enough to just ignore having an army (thanks to the congregation of twats that is Kremlin). Such countries typically institute a mandatory military service for their citizens.

I think you see where this is going. 11 months.

I’ll have some form of Internet access, but without a computer (+ tablet) or scanner new uploads will be sparse. See you in a year.

So.
When you go to study IT, you’d expect to learn…computer-stuffs, right? Programming, software architecture, about the internal life of computers and the sorts, right?
Well, welcome to higher education. Here, find the eigenvectors for those matrices. Now go test this statistical hypothesis. How is this relevant to your specialty, you ask? Well…how about you go prove Brook’s theorem for me, then I’ll think about answering that question.
There’s math in my IT and it’s exactly as disgusting as finding snot in your burger.

So.

When you go to study IT, you’d expect to learn…computer-stuffs, right? Programming, software architecture, about the internal life of computers and the sorts, right?

Well, welcome to higher education. Here, find the eigenvectors for those matrices. Now go test this statistical hypothesis. How is this relevant to your specialty, you ask? Well…how about you go prove Brook’s theorem for me, then I’ll think about answering that question.

There’s math in my IT and it’s exactly as disgusting as finding snot in your burger.

I don’t gush about a lot of things.
I won’t fill your dashboard with announcements of yet another Pokemon game, or with .gifsets of ‘Game Of Thrones’ or ‘Attack On Titan’, or reblog ‘Breaking Bad’ fan art. But gosh darnit, I’m gonna gush about Deus Ex:Human Revolution and you’re gonna love it.
Played through that game again a few months ago. Gosh, do I like the visual style of it. I’m not much of a wordsmith, so I hope the fact that I was walking around the game, making screenshots of interesting things and places and eventually filed my screenshots folder with 120 pictures communicates adequately my love for it style.
I then felt like doing a small sketch featuring all the distinct things about it visual style that I could think of.
Black-and-gold colours? Check
The mondernangular facades of much of DX:HR’s arcitecture?  Check
Dirty, run-down streets of Hengsha with freaking air conditioners everywhere? Check
Fog? Check
The lumbering boxguard? Check
Neon signs? Check
Tiny stair-lights? Check

I don’t gush about a lot of things.

I won’t fill your dashboard with announcements of yet another Pokemon game, or with .gifsets of ‘Game Of Thrones’ or ‘Attack On Titan’, or reblog ‘Breaking Bad’ fan art. But gosh darnit, I’m gonna gush about Deus Ex:Human Revolution and you’re gonna love it.

Played through that game again a few months ago. Gosh, do I like the visual style of it. I’m not much of a wordsmith, so I hope the fact that I was walking around the game, making screenshots of interesting things and places and eventually filed my screenshots folder with 120 pictures communicates adequately my love for it style.

I then felt like doing a small sketch featuring all the distinct things about it visual style that I could think of.

  • Black-and-gold colours? Check
  • The mondernangular facades of much of DX:HR’s arcitecture?  Check
  • Dirty, run-down streets of Hengsha with freaking air conditioners everywhere? Check
  • Fog? Check
  • The lumbering boxguard? Check
  • Neon signs? Check
  • Tiny stair-lights? Check
Playing with that old idea of elementals again.
—-
The husky here was part of a arctic expedition gone wrong. Separated from the others and stuck in a blizzard, things could hardly have been be worse. After desperately searching for his way back in the hounding weather and while on the verge of collapsing, a group of strange expeditioners found him and took him back to their camp for shelter and warmth. But relief quickly turns into despair when he realizes who rescued him…
You see, plutonium has the property of alpha decay which makes plutonium self-heating - large lumps could even boil water. Thanks to that property, plutonium elementals are extra resistant to cold and make excellent polar expeditioners. 
It also means that they are, for their radioactivity, branded as a threat to society and exiled. Polar regions are not just the areas where they do well, they are pretty much the only places they won’t be chased away from. So, over the years, they have set up camps there and formed their own societies.
And the husky now finds himself in one of such camps. What do you do? If you leave now, you are going to be all alone against the still-raging blizzard which you nearly froze to death in. If you stay, you risk being irradiated to death….if the bitter elementals don’t just lynch you first.
The clock is ticking…

Playing with that old idea of elementals again.

—-

The husky here was part of a arctic expedition gone wrong. Separated from the others and stuck in a blizzard, things could hardly have been be worse. After desperately searching for his way back in the hounding weather and while on the verge of collapsing, a group of strange expeditioners found him and took him back to their camp for shelter and warmth. But relief quickly turns into despair when he realizes who rescued him…

You see, plutonium has the property of alpha decay which makes plutonium self-heating - large lumps could even boil water. Thanks to that property, plutonium elementals are extra resistant to cold and make excellent polar expeditioners. 

It also means that they are, for their radioactivity, branded as a threat to society and exiled. Polar regions are not just the areas where they do well, they are pretty much the only places they won’t be chased away from. So, over the years, they have set up camps there and formed their own societies.

And the husky now finds himself in one of such camps. What do you do? If you leave now, you are going to be all alone against the still-raging blizzard which you nearly froze to death in. If you stay, you risk being irradiated to death….if the bitter elementals don’t just lynch you first.

The clock is ticking…

So, I got me Starcraft 2 some time ago, because…it’s an interesting game to watch actually, one of the few video games that is great to spectate and I’ve watched Starcraft 2 tournaments for a while. So it’s be strange to never download and try it myself.
This is my first encounter with playing RTS games online. Annnnd….oh boy.
You see, I’ve grown up with FPS games and they’re quite simple at core. Point gun at dude’s, click, dude explodes! Rinse and repeat. Simple, easy to grasp!
But Starcraft, that devil, expects you to multitask like a amphetamine-infused rabbit in heat (exhibit A). Everything wants your attention and it wants it now or else you get half your army wiped out by mines or all your workers roasted or you run your marines into a barrage of artillery. So my first few games ended up looking more like:
Make marine
Make second marine
Make third marine
Make fo—OHMYGOD THEY’RE ALREADY ATTACKING
HOW DO THEY HAVE SO MUCH STUFF ALREADY!?
WHY DO THEY HAVE TANKS!?!
..followed by an unceremonious surrender.
But, alas, I’ve made it into Gold league by now. According to some statistics floating around, that would make me better than 60% of Stracraft players, so I guess yay me?

So, I got me Starcraft 2 some time ago, because…it’s an interesting game to watch actually, one of the few video games that is great to spectate and I’ve watched Starcraft 2 tournaments for a while. So it’s be strange to never download and try it myself.

This is my first encounter with playing RTS games online. Annnnd….oh boy.

You see, I’ve grown up with FPS games and they’re quite simple at core. Point gun at dude’s, click, dude explodes! Rinse and repeat. Simple, easy to grasp!

But Starcraft, that devil, expects you to multitask like a amphetamine-infused rabbit in heat (exhibit A). Everything wants your attention and it wants it now or else you get half your army wiped out by mines or all your workers roasted or you run your marines into a barrage of artillery. So my first few games ended up looking more like:

  • Make marine
  • Make second marine
  • Make third marine
  • Make fo—OHMYGOD THEY’RE ALREADY ATTACKING
  • HOW DO THEY HAVE SO MUCH STUFF ALREADY!?
  • WHY DO THEY HAVE TANKS!?!

..followed by an unceremonious surrender.

But, alas, I’ve made it into Gold league by now. According to some statistics floating around, that would make me better than 60% of Stracraft players, so I guess yay me?